Headlines

CFA Headlines January 31, 2012

Bargaining & the November Strike
CFA chapter leaders educate Trustees on faculty one-day strike
Trustees adopt last-minute limit on Executive Pay increases
Special Investigator to look into events at Nov. 16 Trustees’ meeting
CFA chapters adopt resolutions on student actions set for March 1 and March 5
CFA chapter opposes Chancellor’s threat to cut Northridge for accepting students
Participate in CFA Hate Crimes Survey
Links of the week

Headlines to include

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Bargaining & the November strike

Striking Faculty and Students

As the new term gets underway, CFA Dominguez Hills Chapter president David Bradfield revisits the November one-day strike in his upcoming Welcome Back message to the faculty on his campus.

“The faculty proved again last fall that we can accomplish great things when we put our minds to it,” Bradfield writes. “The November 17 strike here and at CSU East Bay was historic and highly successful. They said we wouldn’t do it. They said we couldn’t pull it off, and we proved them wrong in a big way.”

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CFA chapter leaders educate Trustees on faculty one-day strike

Striking Faculty and Students

CFA leaders from the two campuses that struck for one day in November addressed the CSU Trustees at their meeting Wednesday at the Chancellor’s Golden Shore Headquarters.

Jennifer Eagan, president of the CFA chapter at CSU East Bay, said the Trustees are only hearing from “a one-man show,” referring to Chancellor Reed. She said in order to make the best policies that can steer the CSU through tough times, they must end “extravagance at the top and cuts at the bottom” and she advised them to “listen to the faculty—we are your eyes and ears on the ground.”

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Trustees adopt last-minute limit on executive pay increases

Executive Pay Increases

Bowing to years of pressure to curb university executive compensation hikes, the CSU Trustees at their meeting on Wednesday adopted a last-minute change to a new pay policy for campus presidents.

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Special Investigator to look into events at Nov. 16 Trustees’ meeting

Special Investigator

One of the more tense moments during any CSU Trustees’ plenary session happened last Wednesday, interestingly, during the adoption of their minutes.

Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom, an ex-officio Trustee, said the minutes had “sanitized” reporting on the tumultuous November 16 meeting when the Trustees moved to another room out of public view during a student protest to vote on a 9% student fee hike.

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CFA chapters adopt resolutions on student actions set for March 1 and March 5

CFA Chapters at San Francisco State and CSU East Bay have adopted resolutions about participation in national days of protest for higher education being called for March 1 and March 5.

See the resolutions at the CFA East Bay and San Francisco State web pages.

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CFA chapter opposes Chancellor’s threat to cut Northridge for accepting students

Budget Cut Threat

The CFA chapter at CSU Northridge has joined student-led opposition to Chancellor Reed’s latest threat to cut funding to the campus. Reed says the campus must reduce the number of students it accepts or risk losing $7 million.

In advance of the cut, campus managers already are limiting class offerings and refusing to allow faculty to place students on wait lists.

Students with MEChA and Students for Quality Education met with interim campus president Harry Hellenbrand, who pointed them to the state legislature and governor.

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Participate in CFA Hate Crimes Survey

Stop Hate Crimes

In light of hate-motivated attacks on CSU campuses, CFA’s Affirmative Action Council is gathering details of faculty member’s experiences and raising awareness of available resources through a survey. The Council will use the results to develop tools that can contribute to safer campuses for all students, staff and faculty.

You are invited to take part in this research.

Learn more about the CFA Affirmative Action Council.

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Links of the week

Viewpoint: Pension-cutting plans on ballot promise savings but don’t deliver
Business professor Steven Filling explains sometimes the truth hurts. In this case, the truth is that the two pension-slashing ballot measures that may face voters in November would provide no effective report while dramatically increasing taxpayer costs by as much as $1 billion a year for as long as 30 years. — Sacramento Bee, Jan. 31, 2012

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