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CFA to begin “reopener” bargaining with management on pay raises

Reopener Bargaining

CFA has begun the process to bargain pay raises for 23,000 faculty in the 23-campus California State University system.

Last week CFA sent a formal notice to CSU management of the intent to re-open talks on the salary section of the current faculty contract. Raises would apply to academic year 2013/14.

CFA and CSU management will hold their opening bargaining session July 1-3 in Sacramento.

“When we settled this contract last year,” says Andy Merrifield, chair of the CFA Bargaining Team, “we agreed to the possibility of raises in the second year. Now that it is very likely the state will begin to step up funding for the university, it makes sense to get the talks started.”

He added, “Raises at this point would be a small step in the right direction. Our members are long overdue.”

CFA faculty and staff made many sacrifices as the CSU grappled with many years of cuts.  CSU employees worked to convince legislators and the governor to make funding for higher education a priority.

CFA employees also worked hard to pass Proposition 30 in the election last November to improve revenues to the state. That helped make more funding possible.

After Gov. Jerry Brown included a $125.1 million funding increase in his proposed budget last January, CSU Chancellor Timothy White announced that if the extra funding came through he would allocate $38 million to raises for employees; only the highest paid senior managers were explicitly left out of the $38 million pool.

The $38 million represents 1.2% of the total pool for all employees. The amount and types of compensation will be determined by the bargaining process for all employees represented by their respective unions.

Beyond reopening the salary section now, the entire faculty contract expires in June 2014.

Bargaining on the whole contract could embark as soon as October 2013. That “successor” bargaining will be an opportunity for CFA’s Bargaining Team to address other contract issues as well as salary.