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CSU Chico Provost Candidate Interviews

The CSU Chico Labor Council is meeting with each of the candidates for Provost and asking them the same set of questions.  Below are the questions and answers for each candidate listed chronologically starting with the most recent interview.

The campus administration is conducting a survey on these candidates and it is due Friday, May 18th at 9:00am.

Candidate: Belle Wei

1. As Provost, who do you work for?
Wei: I work for students, faculty, and staff. We choose to teach at a university, I care about students and shaping a successful future for them.

2. What is your experience working in a Collective Bargaining Environment?
Wei: I have worked at San Jose State for 25 years, I have been on both sides of the coin as a due-paying CFA faculty member, and the agreement is about embodying the balance between faculty rights and responsibilities. As an administrator, our job is to ensure fair treatment for everyone.

3. What does shared governance look like to you?
Wei: Shared governance has to do with the culture of the university. I am a true believer in a democratic process, the faculty and staff, who make student success possible. We solve problems at academic senate, and the CBA between CFA and the University. When a great leader’s work is done, the people say “we did it ourselves”. There are also informal elements besides the CBAs and the policies. We want to teach our students this process by modeling it, there will be some recommendations for improvements.

4. Many faculty complained that the previous Provost launched initiatives with little or no faculty involvement especially at the onset. How will you involve faculty in major initiatives?
Wei: I think faculty should be involved early on, that’s part of the collaborating process. The reality is that the challenges we face are too complex for any individual to solve. It should be collaboration. We should be including faculty and staff in that conversation early on. We should discuss our common goals and purposes; address what our challenges are, and creative ways to address our challenges. In regards to strategic planning at [CSUSJ], early on we formed a task force, which included representatives from staff, faculty, undergrad and grad students. We knew that the purpose of the task force was to engage the community, hold open forums, gather input from all stake holders, analyze the results, and then discuss our shared vision, which helps us become invested in our resources.

5. What are your thoughts on the teacher/scholar model? As provost how would you support the teacher-scholar model in our difficult financial environment?
Wei: I think that’s a good model, our goal is to advance student success and learning. Teaching is important, this provides different ways to learn, Research projects involving students is a very engaging mode of learning. My college supports a faculty initiative with research and service. In this financial situation, we need to be creative and resourceful in order to support faculty. As a provost, the role is different, but I have a lot of experience in the area of working with deans and the advancement office to better our resources.

6. Many faculty have complained at this campus of increased workload for example larger class sizes, reorganization of academic programs and the increased use of online courses all of which have contributed to increasing the ration of students to faculty from 19.5 in 2000 to 22.9 in 2009. How will you insure that faculty have a reasonable workload?
Wei: Part of it is I do believe that we need to support faculty, we do not want to compromise students learning, use of technology , face to face interactions are important to the learning process, we need to involve faculty early in the discussion, we need to be resourceful to be more innovative and entrepreneurial

7. Each department has developed its own standards and policies for retention, tenure and promotion. As Provost, how will you make sure you adhere to those policies?
Wei: Once the policies are developed, the provost should follow them; they have been placed by the faculty, department, and junior faculty. [At CSUSJ] we have a university wide RTP policy, but each college can have own policies, on our taskforce we developed guidelines when I was a dean, service: should be more than just listing your service, you should include how your service made an impact, I met with all faculty and junior faculty regarding this, so that nothing will be a surprise when completing the RTP information

Would you want to move away from departments having their own standards?
Wei: I would first have that conversation with everyone, before I make a decision, I would want to know the history behind this.

8. At this campus from 2007 to 2011 we have seen a 5% decrease in the number of tenured and tenure track faculty, a 15% decrease in lecturers, a 25% decrease in counselors, and a 40% decrease in librarians. As Provost how will you address these numbers?
Wei: Reduction has been done, I would look at which areas that students need the most support, to be intentional and careful with resources available to students, asking students what is most important to them and where we can make improvements, working with students is key.

a) By doing this would this, if we have a department on the verge of collapse, would you close it?
Wei: We need to focus on what makes this campus distinct, no one is favorable, with that framework we would look at our programs, we do not want to do things just because they are convenient, we want to look at how closing a department would affect the university, we would want to look at student aspirations, and how to support those aspirations, this should be our guiding force that will influence curriculum.

9. This campus has a Diversity Action Plan – included as a priority of that same Plan is enhancing the diversity of candidate pools in the recruitment of tenure track faculty. As Provost how might you enhance efforts and direct search committees beyond the conventional attempts which have done little to shift the proportion of ethnic minority from 15% in Fall 2005 to 18% in Fall 2011?
Wei: Outreach is very important; this is a major initiative, advertising in the media that will reach out to minorities, the diversity committee entering the deans’ council. Just like student outreach, networking with minority groups is a great outlet to reach [other] minority students for undergraduate and PhD [programs]. Our focus is more on the undergraduates, outreach to local communities, we have a very active programs, this is a whole pipeline issue, to reach as many minorities,

a) Sometimes we recruit from minorities, but to retain those faculty can be a challenge
Wei: I understand that, there are different cultural norms, Hispanic students are more focused on social issues and less on technical issues, and we can focus on how to integrate this, e.g. how computers can help a community? We need faculty to model for our students, retention should we want to help our community, if we learn our differences we can work together better.

10. As Provost, how do you see your role in securing resources for faculty to meet the mission of the CSU? Alternatively, how would you involve faculty in the decision-making process to reduce expenditures at this campus?
Wei: I have a strong track record in generating resources; I work with faculty and deans. Part [of being] resourceful is being frugal, how [can] we use our resources wisely, can we be creative and innovative what is our goal and how will we accomplish it? If we have done something the same way for the past 30 years, is it working? We should evaluate our processes to see if we can make improvements.

a) Why do we keep hiring more administrators and less faculty – the administration and the faculty are on two different sides in using resources?
Wei: If we cannot work together in a collaborative way, it is very easy to say, let’s just get rid of a department. Let’s not think about fighting against each other, if we make our pie bigger, than a small slice would be bigger than a larger piece of a small pie, we all need to compromise, there are some harsh realities that are beyond our control.

11. In your opinion, what is the single largest issue related to online learning at universities?
Wei: I think it’s not having a clear understanding of assessing student learning. As mentioned in the open forum, we need to use our technology wisely, students watch lectures at home and then come to class to work on projects, instructors should be very aware of students’ learning styles. Part of the assessments is to create environments [where] learning is a social process. Technology is a tool for learning that we must use wisely

12. What do you see as the strengths and challenges at Chico State? What will you do as Provost to build on our strengths and address our challenges?
Wei: You have tremendous strengths, this is a residential campus, and this is a jewel of the CSU system. There is a very supportive environment, as a state university, your commitment to students’ success, your graduation rate is very high. Your commitment to sustainability and challenges including shortages in food, energy and water. This university is in a great position to really tackle these issues. This university lends itself to a great living environment however challenges include budgets, which everyone faces in the CSU system. My track record indicates I would help to generate funds and to advocate for faculty, students and staff

a) How do the conditions of the physical plant affect learning?
Wei: You have a beautiful, attractive campus. You have a university setting, with redesigned courses, including removing desks and replacing them with a round table with chairs, which supports collaboration and communication — a welcoming environment for all students. We want our students to lead productive, happy lives and we need to expand our thinking as educators — we are committed to what we are doing.


 

Candidate:  Elizabeth Hendrey

1. As Provost, who do you work for?
Hendrey: I work for the President but also the University, students, faculty, and staff. The President is who I report to, but my responsibility is with the community, the campus cannot function without everyone.

2. What is your experience working in a Collective Bargaining Environment?
Hendrey: Queens College is a lot like CSU, Chico, all employees are unionized, one union has faculty and administration, clerical, and there are many other unions as well. The bargaining is done at the system level not on campus, I was a member as a faculty when I was there, I do not believe that things here would be vastly different from what I have worked with.

3. What does shared governance look like to you?
Hendrey: Shared governance looks to me like important decisions are made across the campus. On my current campus governance is based on faculty and students, administration does not play such a large role, and the staff council represents the voice of the staff.

4. How do the conditions of buildings impact learning?
Hendrey: My building was not maintained well e.g. the windows were sometimes open while teaching; a building’s construction impacts recruitment and students’ interaction with one another. Our president had a plan for creating gathering places for students by creating new spaces, we created student specific lounges. The environment is important as to how one experience things.

5. Many faculty complained that the previous Provost launched initiatives with little or no faculty involvement especially at the onset. How will you involve faculty in major initiatives?
Hendrey: I think everyone should be involved. I can understand the tendency to move ahead with things, without realizing that not everyone is as enthusiastic about a certain issue. In an academic environment, one cannot work without consensus. At my college I have been working on a strategic plan, seeking broad input, with the quality of life on campus to be upheld, we had a really good conversation. Some people on campus felt like they had never been heard before. We can discuss different opinions; something that may feel obvious to one person may not necessarily be obvious to others.

6. What are your thoughts on the teacher/scholar model? As provost how would you support the teacher-scholar model in our difficult financial environment?
Hendrey: Bounds between the teacher/scholar model is very important. One thing that attracts me to Chico is the focus on student success. Scholarship advances knowledge and informs teaching, they can be combined to advance education, which can be difficult at times. At my college we have chosen to keep some overhead money aside from grants, and combined with state funding, made it available for research. Faculty appreciate our efforts, although the process can be frustrating.


7. Here at CSU Chico, we are described as a teaching university where teaching encompasses 80% of faculty time, and only 20% of faculty time is left for professional development. What are your thoughts on this weighting?
Hendrey: I don’t think I’ve assigned a proportion, but I also consider service. Faculty gradually grows at an institution. I look at teaching and professional development separately, weighing quality over quantity scholarship e.g. look for people to be publishing in quality venues and I look for the appropriate places for this. I respect different disciplines and make each stage clear to faculty; this should be a fair process. As a junior faculty member I had good mentoring. Faculty should know expectations and have guidance along the way, with an objective way to look at this i.e. evidence of teaching, scholarship, service; all of these areas are evolving and ongoing.

8. Many faculty have complained at this campus of increased workload for example larger class sizes, reorganization of academic programs and the increased use of online courses all of which have contributed to increasing the ratio of students to faculty from 19.5 in 2000 to 22.9 in 2009. How will you insure that faculty have a reasonable workload?
Hendrey: I will try to do the best that I can. I am trying to understand the budget issues, it will be balancing what this institution can achieve and trying to stabilize things. We have gone through budget cuts at my college, we have a model with new targets, it is important to be aware of this issue, and to do what I can to alleviate from the student and faculty point of view. However no one knows what is in store.

9. Each department has developed its own standards and policies for retention, tenure and promotion. As Provost, how will you make sure you adhere to those policies?
Hendrey: To some extent, most do not have explicit policies, for different departments they have different requirements, whether it is publishing a book or creating new courses. To understand them, I would read each department standards, evaluate if the person is creating knowledge, are they reaching the appropriate audience? Peer evaluation is important; some departments may need to have a mix of different methods.

10. At this campus from 2007 to 2011 we have seen a 5% decrease in the number of tenured and tenure track faculty, a 15% decrease in lecturers, a 25% decrease in counselors, and a 40% decrease in librarians. As Provost how will you address these numbers?
Hendrey: As a provost, I would need to hear from all sides, I would have to familiarize myself with all budgets. At my college we have retirees not replaced and offices without staff sometimes. We have had many constraints concerning the budget, so I would to try and understand the details as quickly as possible to be able to make decisions.

11. This campus has a Diversity Action Plan – included as a priority of that same Plan is enhancing the diversity of candidate pools in the recruitment of tenure track faculty. As Provost how might you enhance efforts and direct search committees beyond the conventional attempts which have done little to shift the proportion of ethnic minority from 15% in Fall 2005 to 18% in Fall 2011?
Hendrey: I come from a campus where the student body is very diverse however, we still have areas that we want to increase who we work with. In NY we have had problems with recruiting a diverse faculty. One way would be to push search committees to look beyond what they advertise. The PhD project is geared towards minority groups, something that my president has reinstituted as a target. At a time when we have done little hiring, we have had good results. I have seen a lot of faculty efforts to bring in many different people, with so many diverse students, it is important to have role models for them based on faculty.

12. As Provost, how do you see your role in securing resources for faculty to meet the mission of the CSU? Alternatively, how would you involve faculty in the decision-making process to reduce expenditures at this campus?
Hendrey: I think I would be involved with both, I would try to see things in the “long term”; I would try to see in what ways we can find alternative revenues. We are starting to see results at my college, focusing on what these funds are for in regards to faculty, try and diversify from state funding, in terms of cuts, I do think that it should be about getting input to make decisions, to reflect on the impacts of these cuts.

13. In your opinion, what is the single largest issue related to online learning at universities?
Hendrey: The notion that online learning is really going to save a lot of money. It can serve a large region, it can be very useful, and it can save classroom space. We are experimenting with this at my campus but this is very labor intensive. I’m not completely convinced about it, but I would consider, building interaction with learning.

14. What do you see as the strengths and challenges at Chico State? What will you do as Provost to build on our strengths and address our challenges?
Hendrey: Although I have only been on campus a couple of days, I see strength in the faculty and staff who are committed to this institution. I see a campus proud of their retention and graduation numbers and a diverse student body. When I look at staffing the provost office, here you are starting with a better-staffed level. The biggest challenge would be the ongoing budget cuts; the question is “How long can you keep going when you have less and less to work with?” I will try and understand what the resources and strengths are on this campus so that I may find the areas where you can cut without doing serious damage and hope that things stabilize. I do think that things will stabilize at some point.

Dr. Hendrey’s questions for the panel
Hendrey Question: What roles do unions play on campus? On my campus issues impinge on both the university and the unions, what are the strengths of the unions?

CSUEU: As a CSUEU Representative, our union represents Bargaining Units 2,5,7,9, which includes grounds keeping, clericals, and others. We are a varied group, we are very diverse. Our union stewards meet with Human Resources staff, as well as the Provost, every other Wednesday to discuss needs, we try to discuss issues we see coming, before they develop into larger issues. We have a new president in our union. Our approach is moving towards becoming a working Labor Council, where whatever happens with faculty, happens to staff, grounds, etc. We want to collaborate and respect both sides and solve as many issues as possible before they become larger.

SETC: Our union tries to work with everyone so that we can cure problems upfront, we try to work together to solve issues.

Hendrey: Working together before there are problems can aid in assisting with guidance of those groups.

CFA: In regards to CFA, we are the largest faculty union in the country. Our union is composed of faculty, counselors, coaches, and librarians. We have regular labor management meetings to discuss issues. In terms of where we are as a union, we work on two levels, we work at the statewide level negotiating the contract e.g. recently there was a strike vote. We have the right to strike if our mandated, three part process fails to come to a successful conclusion. At the second level on this campus we will meet with the Provost at labor management meetings on a regular and reoccurring basis as well as with President Zingg to be more productive in our communications.

CSUEU: Again with budget cuts, as people retire, we do not replace, we have to beg for any emergency hires to fill vacancies in departments.
SETC: We are operating at half of our staff level we used to have; they must be brought back to staff this campus.

CFA: We believe that we are a community but we see polarization. We see issues with the chancellor e.g. lack of transparency, favoritism toward management including salary, perks such as allowances for housing and cars. By comparison for faculty and staff, we have not seen a salary increase in years.

CSUEU: Similar issues for our union.

CFA: We are in negotiations at present. How do you feel, does the CSU administration have the last word or do you feel that you represent the faculty and staff?

Hendrey: I don’t think I’d last long if I did not have the trust of the faculty and staff. I have seen administrators operate in a bubble, which is not good for the institution. Administrators come and go; however, the faculty and staff are the backbone of the institution. Collaboration is important; having my roots as a faculty member has aided me as a Dean.

CFA: At your college, do your faculty create a professional development plan in terms of the retention tenure promotion process?

Hendrey: On my campus we have annual reappointments. I do not evaluate my chairs, each year I write a reappointment letter, it is not an explicit plan, if there are issues e.g. what do you have to do within three years, what can be done to make sure your application is complete in 3 years. We have improved this over the years; it is beneficial to the retention, tenure and promotion process. Our process is straightforward, we are careful about hiring, this is something I would look into as a provost, there should not be surprises in this process.

 

 

Candidate:  GAYLE HUTCHINSON, May 10th, 2012

1. As Provost, who do you work for?
I work for faculty staff and students and for the President. I work for the community of the university.

2. What is your experience working in a Collective Bargaining Environment?
I was a union faculty member for 17 years, even when I was a department chair. I looked to the union for guidance. As Dean, I still work with the union representatives in various ways.

3. How do the conditions of buildings impact learning?
Maintaining high quality learning environments is important. Old and dank classrooms are difficult to learn in. Everyone’s spirits are lifted when the environments are conducive.

4. What does shared governance look like to you?
It’s central to the functions of this institution. It’s a strong tradition and I will greatly embrace because it makes us who we are. There is opportunity for open communication among the members of the university community. I appreciate that the academic senate involves more than just faculty. Consultation and collaboration are necessary. I try to encourage collaboration when I can before complaints go to a formal arena. I also realize that as provost I will also need to make some decisions.

5. Many faculty complained that the previous Provost launched initiatives with little or no faculty involvement especially at the onset. How will you involve faculty in major initiatives?
I want to be able to rely on the Academic Senate as a working partner to enlist their help in how we move forward with initiatives. I’ll work hard at that partnership.

6. What are your thoughts on the teacher/scholar model? As provost how would you support the teacher-scholar model in our difficult financial environment?
I embrace the teacher scholar model. We are so engaged and have high teaching loads, so working with our students in our research is necessary. I think we should create and embrace new knowledge and share that with our students. Integration of teaching and scholarship can provide opportunities to use fewer resources but I’ll continue to find support for faculty to work on research.

7. Many faculty have complained at this campus of increased workload for example larger class sizes, reorganization of academic programs and the increased use of online courses all of which have contributed to increasing the ratio of students to faculty from 19.5 in 2000 to 22.9 in 2009. How will you insure that faculty have a reasonable workload?
We’ll have to constantly work on that together. I don’t think that is such a large increase given the budget. These are tough times. Some faculty don’t mind taking on large classes. Some faculty will take on 400 students, but other faculty don’t. We can do that by working together and having conversations on that.

8. Each department has developed its own standards and policies for retention, tenure and promotion. As Provost, how will you make sure you adhere to those policies?
It’s important that department standards align with both the CBA and FPPP; in BSS we’ve worked on realigning our policies with the FPPP. Build in periodic review processes – through Faculty Affairs. Assist departments with resources for how they can do this. I encourage departments to mentor their faculty through this process.

9. At this campus from 2007 to 2011 we have seen a 5% decrease in the number of tenured and tenure track faculty, a 15% decrease in lecturers, a 25% decrease in counselors and a 40% decrease in librarians. As provost how will you address these numbers?
Look at the workforce as a whole, but being mindful that with shrinking resources, coming budget cuts is reality. We need to examine workload to make sure that the functions are occurring. I would examine it very carefully to find ways to make our office and internal processes more effective but how we can support academic programs with least amount of disruption.

10. This campus has a Diversity Action Plan — included as a priority of that same Plan is enhancing the diversity of candidate pools in the recruitment of tenure track faculty. As Provost how might you enhance efforts and direct search committees beyond the conventional attempts which have done little to shift the proportion of ethnic minority faculty from 15% in Fall 2005 to 18% in Fall 2011?
I put the DAP very high up on my priority list and I would like to continue to move forward on that. I would give strong effort to make sure we improve those pools and how search committees attract candidates. One way is going to departments and provide examples of how we can do that better. We can learn from other universities also.

11. As Provost, how do you see your role in securing resources for faculty to meet the mission of the CSU? Alternatively, how would you involve faculty in the decision-making process to reduce expenditures at this campus?
Ask Academic Senate to engage faculty and staff in how we reduce the budget, making decisions about how to make our work more efficient. We can also become innovative by looking for other ways we can find revenue streams, such as grants and contracts. We can work at incentivizing faculty to find these sources.

12. In your opinion, what is the single largest issue related to online learning at universities?
I define online as completely online. I think there is a place for completely face-to-face. There is an increased interest in hybrid classes. I think hybrid platforms offer more for improving activity, teaching, interaction but technology is a tool and the biggest issue is finding the best tool that best meets the needs of my students and enhances learning. Online provides access for those who are not able to come to campus, and access is important and our responsibility.

13. What do you see as the strengths and challenges at Chico State? What will you do as Provost to build on our strengths and address our challenges?
The number one strength is the people who work here and the students. We create the Chico experience. Academic excellence is also very strong. Applied learning, servicing learning, civic engagement is also one of our strengths. Location and history are strengths. Our vision to sustain our mission is a strength. Working toward being green. Our biggest challenge is how to navigate through the budget cuts and the shifting landscape of higher education. There is more competition for students than ever before, but also more students needing higher ed so we need to make ourselves available to those students with a high quality education. We have to re-imagine how we provide for our students and who we are and what we can do with less resources. Building on the strengths is the easiest because we have so many assets. Biggest challenge is find a way to bring people together while we make these decisions. I think one of my strengths is bringing people from diverse groups together.

Dr. Hutchinson’s questions for the panel:
What are you looking for from a provost?

CFA: A number of issues have come up on this campus related to budget and one of the primary concerns is insuring that the CBA is clearly understood and followed. The CFA Presidents have been talking about offering a series of workshops to facilitate that conversation. A number of department chairs across the CSU have worked with the union to make sure that rights of faculty are respected and issues are addressed when necessary. We want to build on that.

CSUEU: We would like the provost to have a relationship with CSUEU, even if it was only with staff on the academic side.

SETC: Some way of working together so we don’t take the biggest part of the hit and that cuts are equitable across units.

What concerns you most about the university?
CFA: Program suspensions and the misuse of program dollars for graduate students. We are concerned about consultation during this process and more dialogue about, the impact on faculty , staff and students. There are grave concerns about the privatization/corporatization of public education.

CSUEU: The reorganization and loss of staff jobs. Loss of positions but no reduction in workload. e.g. number of documents and forms in the RTP process. There has been 7-8 years with not even a 1% increase in salary.

SETC: No one filling the vacant job positions and facilities are starting to show it.

What is our greatest strength?
CFA: Faculty, staff, and students. People are often overlooked as our greatest assets, including those students who typically are under-represented and under-served from our own catchment area.

CSUEU: Shared governance is a strength, but we can continue to grow in that area to give more people more voice.

SETC: Where else can you walk out of a building and be in a park? Our environment.

 

 

Candidate:  REX FULLER, May 4th, 2012

 

1. As Provost, who do you work for?
Report directly to the president, but we all work for the great state of California. I’m a labor economist. Higher purpose we all serve. Any supervisor role you are serving the groups that directly report to you. There are horizontal and vertical relationships and we all have roles to play and we need to be aligned as possible.

2. What is your experience working in a Collective Bargaining Environment? If you do not have experience working with unions, how do you plan to operate in a university where we are unionized?
How to balance the needs of the faculty and needs of administration?
There isn’t necessarily a conflict here. In my experience, I was prepared with knowledge about labor contract and dissect the problem related to the policies. Contracts, whether collectively bargained or not, need to be followed. Collective bargaining can sometimes be helpful to that process. Taught as recently as last year. Teaching is refreshing to an administrator’s viewpoint.  “tyranny of the urgent” – what’s really important is the students’ learning experience.

3. What does shared governance look like to you?
Example of changes made at his institution: Faculty senate had just faculty on IT committee, there were issues with this (couldn’t get a quorum), so we met to discuss alternative committee structure to be more effective. What you have in the room is both the detail and the higher level so you’re getting more perspective.

4. Many faculty complained that the previous Provost launched initiatives with little or no faculty involvement especially at the onset. How will you involve faculty in major initiatives?
Similar example from his campus where the provost resigned mid-year. Came into the “crest of the wave” when the reorganization was happening. No direct layoffs related to the reorganization but people were re-deployed. Even with combined units, there are still requirements for needed support e.g. combining two colleges will take out a dean, but you’ll need an associate dean to do the duties required. Organizations are organic; you need to think about the connections. You have to be cautious and careful before you make the final decision.

Another example: change of calendar from quarters to semesters. Task force chaired by the CIO, lack of real participation, the report was just a status report of what some campuses do. Senate chair and senate committee chairs decided who should be in the room, and they discussed what the issues would be around calendar changes, curriculum, cost, etc. Still talking about it. More discussion about how faculty would adapt curriculum. Should we do it, is it a good use of scarce resources?

5. What are your thoughts on the teacher/scholar model? As provost how would you support the teacher-scholar model in our difficult financial environment?
Technology allows us to think differently about how we deliver curriculum. Hybrid courses allow technology to enhance learning. Western Governors is not the model. Need to serve remote populations. Faculty have to design the technology around their curriculum and learning goals.

6. Many faculty have complained at this campus of increased workload for example larger class sizes, reorganization of academic programs and the increased use of online courses all of which have contributed to increasing the ratio of students to faculty from 19.5 in 2000 to 22.9 in 2009. How will you insure that faculty have a reasonable workload?
Question was not asked as we ran out of time

7. Each department has developed its own standards and policies for retention, tenure and promotion. As Provost, how will you make sure you adhere to those policies?
If there is a problem with policy, fix the policy, but don’t hold someone accountable to how you think the policy ought to read. Can a department aim too low? Yes, but then the goal is to work with the faculty to help develop better policies and dialogue e.g. a faculty activity plan – chair and new faculty develop a 6 year plan to be successful in achieving tenure. Faculty member, chair, dean, provost approve the plan. A new plan implemented for associates. Improvement plan required when faculty do not have strong reviews.

8. At this campus from 2007 to 2011 we have seen a 5% decrease in the number of tenured and tenure track faculty, a 15% decrease in lecturers, a 25% decrease in counselors and a 40% decrease in librarians. As provost how will you address these numbers?
Question was not asked as we ran out of time

9. This campus has a Diversity Action Plan — included as a priority of that same Plan is enhancing the diversity of candidate pools in the recruitment of tenure track faculty. As Provost how might you enhance efforts and direct search committees beyond the conventional attempts which have done little to shift the proportion of ethnic minority faculty from 15% in Fall 2005 to 18% in Fall 2011?
“Hard to hire fields” as a business dean, search committees are mostly screen and not search. Write to all the directors of programs around the country and tell them we are hiring, we’d like your graduates. Affirmative Action officers ask how did you find out about our opening? Candidates of color generally don’t rely on the Chronicle of Higher Education. Ask faculty to participate in caucuses where faculty are studying issues of equity, recruit from these groups. Change the way you screen. Each search member has to take one candidate packet and screen IN, rather than screen out. Screening in seeks to better understand standard information/criteria in a new way. 6/30 faculty hired last year [at his campus] were white men. Also building a culture on campus where faculty of color can fit in. Try to be present at diversity events.

10. As Provost, how do you see your role in securing resources for faculty to meet the mission of the CSU? Alternatively, how would you involve faculty in the decision-making process to reduce expenditures at this campus?
Question was not asked as we ran out of time

11. In your opinion, what is the single largest issue related to online learning at universities?
Question was not asked as we ran out of time

12. What do you see as the strengths and challenges at Chico State? What will you do as Provost to build on our strengths and address our challenges?
Personally I want to live here. This is the only place I’m looking at. We need to start thinking about the future. Your academic array are perfectly positioned, trend toward graduate programs, trend toward intersecting programs across disciplines. The number of awards your students receive are indicative of the quality. Grant level is high. Honor to be here at my alma mater. <Challenges portion of the question was not answered>

13.  How do the conditions of the building affect learning?

Impressed by the overall campus plan. Campus looks great.
 

Commands